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LGBTQ+ Themed Virtual Field Trips: Learn More

"No pride for some of us without liberation for all of us." - Marsha P. Johnson

Interested in learning more and accessing materials to support your students' learning? Check out the resources below!

Books and Curriculum Resources

Hidden Voices: LGBTQ+ Stories in United States History

The Hidden Voices LGBTQ+ project was initiated to help students learn about and honor the innumerable people who questioned and broke the normed expectations of gender and sexuality, and who were therefore often hidden from the traditional historical record. These individuals influenced the social, political, artistic, and economic landscape in so many ways, and their contributions continue to shape our history and identity.

  • Hidden Voices: LGBTQ+ Stories in United States History project allows students to find their own voice as they become analysts of the past and make connections between the past and the present. The design and included resources allow teachers to integrate and explore inclusive learning experiences that validate the diverse perspectives and contributions of underrepresented individuals and groups in the LGBTQ+ community. The 20 individual profiles and five portraits of an era essays featured in this instructional resource are just some examples of the range of LGBTQ+ figures and events that can be integrated within the broader historical narrative and social studies curriculum.
  • Explore draft lessons synthesized from Hidden Voices: LGBTQ+ Stories in United States History. These lessons provide models for teaching the profiles and portraits of an era found in Hidden Voices: LGBTQ+ Stories in United States History.

Vocabulary

Videos for Grades 9-12

Explore videos that can supplement your lessons! These are most appropriate for high school students.